Things I'm addicted to and enjoy: Agatha Christie, mysteries, reading and collecting books, Dark Shadows (TV), Stephen King, writing, movies, Saturday afternoons and more than I can possibly list. Follow me and find out. Enjoy!

outdoormagic:

Part of our Northern Border by Rosarian49 on Flickr.

So beautiful and picturesque…

outdoormagic:

Part of our Northern Border by Rosarian49 on Flickr.

So beautiful and picturesque…

not-so-classicallytrainedwriter:

Check out this mix on @8tracks: Slightly Haunted - A Writing Mix by hjshaw16.
This is just a nice little writing playlist I decided to share that I use when writing. I would recommend this playlist to writers of horror, suspense, thriller, dark YA, dark fantasy, gothic, and urban fantasy. Enjoy! 

not-so-classicallytrainedwriter:

Check out this mix on @8tracks: Slightly Haunted - A Writing Mix by hjshaw16.

This is just a nice little writing playlist I decided to share that I use when writing. I would recommend this playlist to writers of horror, suspense, thriller, dark YA, dark fantasy, gothic, and urban fantasy. Enjoy! 

There is more than one way to burn a book. And the world is full of people running about with lit matches.

Ray Bradbury

Book Geek Quote #611

(via bookgeekconfessions)

amandaonwriting:

Stephen King Cartoon
Happy Birthday, Stephen King, born 21 September 1947

amandaonwriting:

Stephen King Cartoon

Happy Birthday, Stephen King, born 21 September 1947

Except you can’t show a topless woman on TV - and you can’t defibrillate a woman in a bra. So victims of heart attacks on TV are always male. Did you know that a woman having a heart attack is more likely to have back or jaw pain than chest or left arm pain? I didn’t - because I’ve never seen a woman having a heart attack. I’ve been trained in CPR and Advanced First Aid by the Red Cross over 15 times in my life, the videos and booklets always have a guy and say the same thing about clutching his chest and/or bicep.

And people laugh when I tell them women are still invisible in this world.

distractedbyshinyobjects

re: feministing - for women, heart attacks look different

Things I did not know, but should.

(via elfgrove)

This is a post that might save a life. 

(via str8nochaser)

My mom worked for 25 years as an ER nurse and is convinced that a lot of women die simply because folks only know heart attack symptoms that occur in males. 

(via darkjez)

Society thinks our bodies are so scandalous that it’s better to put our lives at risk than to show us how to stay safe

(via callingoutsexists)

A friend of mine was having a cardiac episode recently, and it began with jaw pain. I had never heard of this before, and god help us, she had to explain to me how cardiac events present in women WHILE HAVING ONE. (I didn’t disbelieve her, I just had idea what the jaw pain meant.)

She is fine now. But if your heart is failing, I suspect you have better things to do than explain to your slow but well-meaning friend the symptoms of a heart attack in women.

(via thatassholewhat)

amandaonwriting:

21-27 September 2014 is Banned Books Week

What is Banned Books Week?

Banned Books Week is the book community’s annual celebration of the freedom to read. Banned Books Week was launched in 1982 in response to a sudden surge in the number of challenges to books in schools, book stores and libraries. More than 11 000 books have been challenged since 1982.

The 10 most challenged titles of 2013 were:

  1. Captain Underpants (series), by Dav Pilkey
    Reasons: Offensive language, unsuited for age group, violence
  2. The Bluest Eye, by Toni Morrison
    Reasons: Offensive language, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group, violence
  3. The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, by Sherman Alexie
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  4. Fifty Shades of Grey, by E.L. James
    Reasons: Nudity, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  5. The Hunger Games, by Suzanne Collins
    Reasons: Religious viewpoint, unsuited to age group
  6. A Bad Boy Can Be Good for A Girl, by Tanya Lee Stone
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit
  7. Looking for Alaska, by John Green
    Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  8. The Perks of Being a Wallflower, by Stephen Chbosky
    Reasons: drugs/alcohol/smoking, homosexuality, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group
  9. Bless Me Ultima, by Rudolfo Anaya
    Reasons: Occult/Satanism, offensive language, religious viewpoint, sexually explicit
  10. Bone (series), by Jeff Smith
    Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence

If you want to find out which books were the most challenged over the past 13 years, follow this link: The Top Ten Challenged Books Lists: 2001-2013

by Amanda Patterson

intersectionalfeminism:

espritfollet:

This is a map of Asia. North Americans, you may notice this map is not solely comprised of Japan, Korea, China and Thailand. People in the UK, you may notice India is not  a continent. That is, if those of you who generalize entire continents can even pinpoint India on a map. 
Indians are Asian, gasp! And not all brown skinned people are Indian, also, gasp! There are an alarming amount of people, of all ages, from all backgrounds, who seem to be unable to process this.
I’m ethnically Asian. Since Asia is an extremely large continent, I could be from any number of countries. I am neither from India, China, Korea, Japan or Pakistan, yet not so surprisingly, I am still Asian. 
Yes, there are commonalities across regions, through the conflation of cultures, colonialism, globalization, transnationalism and movement of diasporas. Sometimes these are all the same thing. Rickshaws, rice and curry can be found across the continent.
But let’s not overgeneralize. You can also find Buddhists, Catholics, Muslims and Hindus across Asia. Cantonese Speaking Chinese Muslims! English Speaking Indian Jews! 
No, we are not all the same. Orientalism? (Please look up Edward Said for basic concepts) No thank you. 
So let’s not use umbrella terms, regarding Asians as a monolith while simultaneously denying the regional identity of millions of people- and how about we also not engage in xenophobia? 
Are you someone that thinks this way? Shame on you! You should perhaps invest in buying a map, and take a look at what countries are you know, where. 
Geography, people. It’s important. 

For anyone out there who might not be able to see this image, it is a coloured map showing Northern Asia, Central Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, and South-Eastern Asia. 
Central Asia consists of Afghanistan (debated), Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. 
Eastern Asia consists of China, Hong Kong, Japan, Macau, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan. 
Northern Asia consists of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Russia.
South Asia consists of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. 
South-Eastern Asia consists on Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Brunei, Cambodia, Christmas Island, Cocos Islands, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam. 
Western Asia consists of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt (debated), Georgia, Iran (debated), Iraq, Israel, Joran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.

intersectionalfeminism:

espritfollet:

This is a map of Asia. North Americans, you may notice this map is not solely comprised of Japan, Korea, China and Thailand. People in the UK, you may notice India is not  a continent. That is, if those of you who generalize entire continents can even pinpoint India on a map. 

Indians are Asian, gasp! And not all brown skinned people are Indian, also, gasp! There are an alarming amount of people, of all ages, from all backgrounds, who seem to be unable to process this.

I’m ethnically Asian. Since Asia is an extremely large continent, I could be from any number of countries. I am neither from India, China, Korea, Japan or Pakistan, yet not so surprisingly, I am still Asian. 

Yes, there are commonalities across regions, through the conflation of cultures, colonialism, globalization, transnationalism and movement of diasporas. Sometimes these are all the same thing. Rickshaws, rice and curry can be found across the continent.

But let’s not overgeneralize. You can also find Buddhists, Catholics, Muslims and Hindus across Asia. Cantonese Speaking Chinese Muslims! English Speaking Indian Jews! 

No, we are not all the same. Orientalism? (Please look up Edward Said for basic concepts) No thank you. 

So let’s not use umbrella terms, regarding Asians as a monolith while simultaneously denying the regional identity of millions of people- and how about we also not engage in xenophobia? 

Are you someone that thinks this way? Shame on you! You should perhaps invest in buying a map, and take a look at what countries are you know, where. 

Geography, people. It’s important. 

For anyone out there who might not be able to see this image, it is a coloured map showing Northern Asia, Central Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, and South-Eastern Asia. 

Central Asia consists of Afghanistan (debated), Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan. 

Eastern Asia consists of China, Hong Kong, Japan, Macau, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, and Taiwan. 

Northern Asia consists of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Russia.

South Asia consists of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, and Sri Lanka. 

South-Eastern Asia consists on Andaman and Nicobar Islands, Brunei, Cambodia, Christmas Island, Cocos Islands, East Timor, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar (Burma), Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam. 

Western Asia consists of Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt (debated), Georgia, Iran (debated), Iraq, Israel, Joran, Kuwait, Lebanon, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Turkey, United Arab Emirates, and Yemen.


itwasthebestoflines:
“Juliet, Naked" by Nick Hornby (2009).

itwasthebestoflines:

Juliet, Nakedby Nick Hornby (2009).

wellwornwornwell:

Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey, 1972

The absolute Lord Peter Wimsey, hands down.

wellwornwornwell:

Ian Carmichael as Lord Peter Wimsey, 1972

The absolute Lord Peter Wimsey, hands down.